Now, while I’m sure the majority of people who find themselves pursuing this site have heard at least two of the projects over here, those who have not should definitely take the time out of their day to hear the originals before delving into remixes of any sort.

On an even more topical note, for those who are unaware of the glorious realm that is southern hip-hop, which eventually branched from its bouncier production to the drank-inspired sound, it’s evident that the H-Town made their cultural stamp on the game.

If you’re planning on starting anywhere, you’ve got to make sure that it’s “3 ’N The Mornin’.” I placed projects of that stature on a tier of their own when it came to making this list, long live DJ Screw.

Earl Sweatshirt’s “I Don’t Like Shit I Don’t Go Outside

Premier Tracks: “Mantra,” “Off Top,” “AM//Radio” (featuring Wiki)

Chopped Up by: Anthony

*note* It’s Halloween night and I’m currently adding this as my last addition to this list because it is vital.

This is by far the eeriest piece of work on this list, with the gloomy production crafted at the hand of randomblackdude (Mr. Sweatshirt himself, for those who aren’t unaware). The lyrical material this man has consistently been able to spew never fails to impress me, and the first time that I gave this under-30-minute-wonder a listen has had me fully immersed in each syllable he’s spit ever since.

Though the mix isn’t anything too special on this random Soundcloud playlist, I merely looked it up for the sake of having something a bit more grimy to celebrate this year’s Halloween with. Needless to say, this one is a seamless fit.

Travis Scott’s “Days Before Rodeo

Premier Tracks: “The Prayer, “Skyfall” (featuring Young Thug), “Grey”

Chopped Up by DJ Purpberry

Don’t get it twisted, Travis Scott’s new music is whack as hell, and because of it I barely even go back and listen to the material that initially reeled my ear in to begin with. But, I’m going to disregard all of the stuff I’ve said in the past year in order to put this list together.

The sloppy vocals on “Skyfall” are decked in full-on purple candy paint, but that doesn’t even make it what earns this project a spot on this list. Young Thug’s verse is, though. And if Young Thug doesn’t fit your pallet, then I don’t know what the hell you’re listening to Travis Scott for.

Drake’s “So Far Gone

Premier Songs: “Uptown,” “November 18th,” “Bria’s Interlude”

Chopped Up: DJ Purpberry

There’s simply no doubt as to why this mixtape belongs on such a list. Drake’s claim to fame was an H-Town inspired piece of work from start to finish. Whether it’s his ode the dancers throughout the city’s infamous strip clubs on “Houstatlantavegas,” his iconic, (already) screwed vocals on “November 18th” or the goddamn Bun B feature, this project was simply as dripped-up as it gets.

Hell, the origin story behind this project starts out in the city itself.

Lil Wayne’s camp had phoned over Drake and told him to come down to Texas because Weezy loved what he was hearing, as the majority of the planet has grown to feel the same way over the course of the past decade.

Frank Ocean’s “Blonde

Premier Tracks: “Self Control,” “Close to You,” “Nikes” and honestly every other song on here

Chopped Up (although not slopped up): “Purpl” by Slim K

When it comes to this album, any form of tracklist rearrangement automatically catches my full attention because there are so many varying stories that this project can tell. But, in all honesty, I’m sure that just has to be the stan in me talking.

All in all, I find it funny how I came back to write about this, because my initial memory of listening to anything off of this project starts on the morning that he released the video for “Nikes,” in which both his Houston inspired ad-libs and instantly-ubiquitous chipmunk vocals and vocals combated with one another, were so out of left-field. Though this sadly turned out to be no more than the video version of the song (ergo, “I got twooooo versiooooons,”).

The “Close To You” remix on this project is a sedative that would genuinely be banned throughout the nation if the government were to have a say in things. You get to hear all of the high-pitched Frank Ocean vocals in a deeper key, and there’s a very small amount of things that are any better than this. I say that simply because it’s hard to top the original masterpiece crafted by the New Orleans-bred artist, and all of these words apply for the next project as well.

Lil Wayne’s “Tha Carter II

Premier Tracks: “Tha Mobb,” “Mo Fire,” “Grown Man

Chopped Up: Swishahouse

Nevermind this is (probably) my favorite rap album of the 2000s, there’s genuinely no bias behind any of the following statements. Lil Wayne’s fifth album sounds like it was destined to be screwed up to the max, as his syrupy cadences and hard-headed punchlines sound even more emphasized and prolific than what the standard, muggle edition of “Tha Carter II,” the mere second installment of the most important series in his discography.

The introductory keys to “Fly In” shift from punchy to sentimental and subtle through a mere set of scratches before Weezy goes on to do what he does best. Remixed by Swishahouse, the independent southern rap powerhouse founded by OG Ron C, there’s no doubt that they knew exactly what they were doing down in H-Town with this one.

When you factor in my claim that “Tha Mobb” is arguably the greatest rap song of all time and then manage to stretch it out from its original five minutes and 21 seconds to anything more, well, I have nothing else to do but say thank you.

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