addic.tech
Addic.tech reinvents the way people listen to music. (Image via Pixabay)
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addic.tech

Addic.tech breaks the music-streaming mold by providing a passionate, high-quality experience.

It’s a cold, cold world out there for emerging music artists. Whether it’s the greedy record labels or the soul-devouring streaming services, two things seem to always remain true: The path toward success is an arduous one, and the sharks are always hungry. But despite the many pitfalls, Addic.tech exists as one of the few music services looking out for the underdogs.

Addic.tech was founded in 2004 by a small team of music addicts and has since grown into a multi-faceted home for the world’s most talented bass music artists. Addic.tech strives to curate an environment where underground electronic artists and their music can flourish, and they ought to be proud of what they’ve built so far.

Since 2007, Addic.tech has been a two-headed monster of a company, moving beyond its initial format as an online record store to also serve as a music downloading service.  Fast-forward to today, and the streaming service is still delivering the same high-quality bass music it has always promised.

Considering how difficult popular streaming services make life for emerging artists, it’s good to know that Addic.tech is at least looking out for some of these young producers. If you happen to be a fan of electronic music, or simply take interest in any company that looks out for the artist first, look no further than Addic.tech for a slew of wonderful features that make the site one of the best places to discover new music.

Addic.tech’s promise of quality over quantity

One way that Addic.tech has differentiated itself from other music streaming services is through their focus on supplying customers with the highest quality products and service. Spotify, on the other hand, takes an alternative approach, fixating on expanding their vast catalog of approximately 2 million artists.

Granted, Spotify and similar mass-streaming services provide their consumers with a lot of options, but the quality of the music files is never anything to brag about. This is especially the case for anyone not paying the membership fee, as anyone using the free version of the service can only listen to lower quality versions of their favorite songs.

Addic.tech outdoes the freemium model, offering their listeners three file formats — 320 kbps (kilobits per second) mp3, FLAC and WAV — for no additional charge. This user-friendly feature attracts casual music fans and audiophiles alike by ensuring the best quality product on the market. If you find yourself frequently listening to electronic music, then Addic.tech is the best place to find a high-quality listening experience.

Their Incomparable Passion for Music

Perhaps Addic.tech’s most unique selling point is their passion for underground electronic music. Sure, Pandora and Spotify cover a much wider array of musicians, but Addic.tech’s specialized approach to music streaming shows just how genuine the creators are about the music they promote. Also, the majority of music sales on Addic.tech goes directly to the artist/label.

This certainly differs from the business models of Pandora and Spotify, both of whom are notorious for skimping on payments to small artists. Take Pandora, for example, who pays out far more royalties to artists when their music is streamed by members who pay for the service. Considering Pandora’s recent struggles to turn a profit from their paid subscribers, it’s no wonder small artists are struggling to make a living out of the service.

Spotify’s freemium model is similarly difficult for emerging artists. Like Pandora, Spotify pays much more to an artist when their music is streamed by paid members, who unfortunately are also in the minority. Furthermore, recent reports have shown that Spotify pays only $0.006-$0.0084 to music rights holders, which is often split between a record label, producers, songwriters and so forth.

This frugal approach might have something to do with the fact that Spotify has been struggling for years to turn any sort of profit. It seems as though, unlike Addic.tech, Spotify’s intentions of being an all-encompassing streaming service has proven difficult for more than just the individual artists.

Addic.tech’s unique and specialized focus on bass music helps to ensure fans that the majority of the money they spend actually goes to the pockets of the hardworking artists.

Simplicity

Addic.tech is a fantastic introduction to a vast catalog of complex, cutting-edge music, and the platform’s greatest feature is its easy-to-use format.

Anyone who’s ever had a music streaming app on their phone knows just how frustrating they can be. They crash, they require constant updates (and even the updates never seem to solve the problems you actually want solved.)  Addic.tech avoids this problem by ditching the app-based model altogether and instead focuses on curating a seamless website.

The website is simple and runs more smoothly than any other streaming service. Its layout is easy to navigate, giving users the ability to jump from song to song as they weave through the weekly, monthly and yearly music charts.

Each release, whether a single or a full-fledged album, comes with a list of tags that help to define the music and help lead you to more of that same style. Addic.tech also gives you two different ways to keep track of music: The “queue” feature lets you collect music as you navigate through the app for later listening, and the “Gems” feature allows you to keep track of your favorite purchased music. Addic.tech might just be the most accessible and aesthetically pleasing way to discover new music.

Whether you consider yourself to be an avid fan of electronic music, or just simply love discovering and supporting new artists, it’s certainly worth your while to check out what the Addic.tech team has been up to for the past 15 years.

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