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From rap to jazz to soul, this up-and-coming artist does it all.

From day one, Ryn was destined to create music. One of his first memories is him playing drums in his garage. At just 6-years-old, he used this musical inclination to play the same instrument at his family church in Eustis, Florida.

Growing up in Pine Hills, a community west of Orlando, Ryn was heavily influenced by Southern rap. His father, a former member of the American funk/soul band The Commodores, taught Ryn and his brother to play the EMU mp7, a beat machine, which led Ryn to discover his natural talent for producing.

Ryn’s first gig was at his eighth-grade talent show where he composed a song, titled “Head 2 Toe,” with his two brothers and four sisters. The same song led to an encore performance and his first published track. A year later, the group called Alluvion, which consisted of Ryn, his brother and Q Alexander, traveled around the state of Florida to perform at high schools and other small venues.

Before his career as a musician, Ryan was a former student at Evans High School. Although he was an AP and honors student, he struggled to fit in among other students. Despite this adversity, Dopeboys Records showed interest in working with him in the studio. Sometime later, Ryn would produce music for the people in his community.

His ability to rap, sing, create beats and play three instruments suits any genre. “It’s hard to pin down the kind of music,” Ryn said. Being surrounded by poverty and sitting with some of the biggest names in music has allowed him to create melodies that overflow with jazz, rap, pop, soul and Southern trap beats.

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Finally, higher education came Ryn’s way with a music scholarship to Florida A&M University (FAMU). During his time at FAMU, Ryn and his best friend Caleb formed a band, known as Formally Approaching Crowds Everywhere (F.A.C.E).

Ryn’s experiences at school and with F.A.C.E allowed for a lot of self-discovery. For instance, when Ryn performed in a beat battle in front of the entire student body, he developed his sense of confidence and enjoyed the thrill of performing. The young artist did so well that the university recognized him and F.A.C.E as a collegiate organization. The band would soon expand and perform at SuperBowl parties and other large events. As music consumed his life, Ryn decided to leave school.

Shortly after quitting the books, the artist went on to release his first single “Spaceship” on his EP “Off the Record,” in 2014. A year later, he toured the United Kingdom with his father. His original music and outstanding performances created a fan base in England and put “Spaceship” on BBC’s radio track list. Once his tour of the U.K. was complete, Ryn was invited to perform at a Jazz Festival in Indonesia. After lots of traveling and performing, the artist took some well-deserved time off.

Although Florida held a special place in Ryn’s heart — a place where he had his first song and first love — the artist moved to New York, in search of a deeper and more passionate purpose. The change was not easy, especially with people turning away from him.

But it was in New York where Ryn changed his thinking and found himself. He wanted his stage name, Ryan Rekords, which was given to him as a joke by his friend, to reflect this change. The artist and his brothers agreed that Ryn was “more melodic, rolling off the tongue and a reflection of the time change.”

After a lonely and financially burdensome six months in New York, Ryn decided to travel home to Florida to work on a new song, entitled “Get It Right.” After listening to a song by Aaliyah, Ryn was inspired to write his own song. On an early morning in his dark apartment, Ryn grabbed his guitar, produced some chords and created a masterpiece. With some freestyled verses, a strong hook and a feature from his friend Q Alexander, “Get It Right” was complete.

The single, featured on SoundCloud, begins with the stroke of guitar strings, making listeners feel like they’re sitting in the same room as Ryn while music fills their ears. Then, a loop takes over and blends the sounds together, creating a catchy flow to the song. Ryn’s melodious lines, combined with the eloquence of Q Alexander proclaiming “It’s your turn to let me get it right,” intrigues listeners.

Fans have been yearning for more information about the love story portrayed in “Get It Right.” The answers to any unanswered questions might come with Ryn’s music video for this single, along with his EP “Boy Meets World,” which is coming out sometime this year and includes the already-released single.

Ryn’s self definitions “musical, innovative, and a bop” make him an easy favorite for people who have been on his journey or are just joining it. He is open to collaborate with anyone who is up to create music for fans and SoundCloud.

So, what can be taken away from the life of Ryn? Even with the trials and errors of life, Ryn promotes positivity and a good outlook on life. “Before the music became serious, it was always fun. It was a playground. I always kept that kid inside I didn’t want to get off the playground.” Stick around and enjoy the ride by following this up and coming artist on Instagram and Twitter.

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